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Showing 10 results from a total of 580

| Issue 1

Science teachers take centre stage

Would you know how to turn a bucket into a seismograph, how to make a scale model of a DNA double helix from cans and bottles, or how to simulate a human eye with the help of a shampoo bottle? Barbara Warmbein from the European Space Agency in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, finds out.

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Events
 

| Issue 1

The sky’s the limit

What inspires someone to be a spacecraft designer? And how can you become one? Russ Hodge from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, interviews Adam Baker and reveals all.  

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Profiles

| Issue 2

Epigenetics

We tend to think of our genetic information as being encoded in DNA – in our genes. Brona McVittie from Epigenome NoE, UK, describes why this is only part of the story.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Health
       

| Issue 2

A new tree of life

At the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany, Peer Bork’s research group has meticulously reconstructed a new tree of life – tracing the course of evolution. Russ Hodge explains.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Biology
   

| Issue 2

Free science journals

Are you looking for a good article to use in a lesson? Or do you just want to browse a science journal or two for inspiration? Here is a selection of free online science journals and some useful tools for tracking down the books, articles and journals you need.

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Resources

| Issue 2

Learning from Patients: The Science of Medicine

The goal of this DVD is to show how information collected from patients often allows scientists to achieve a deeper understanding of the genetic and molecular basis of a specific disease. This level of understanding is crucial to developing treatments for disease and, consequently, to relieving…

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Resources

| Issue 2

The Physics of Superheroes, By James Kakalios

Superman, Batman, Lightning Lad, Spiderman – they all apply the principles of physics to perform their extraordinary feats… or do they? Which laws are suspended, and which are extended? Which are indeed forgotten completely?

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Resources