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Showing 8 results from a total of 8

| Issue 31

Cell spotting – let’s fight cancer together!

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn,” Benjamin Franklin once said. Make that quote yours and involve your students in a real cancer-research project that will teach them more than just genetics and cell death.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology
           

| Issue 23

Exploding chromosomes: how cancer begins

​Brain tumours are one of the most common causes of death in children – and may begin when chromosomes are torn apart during cell division.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Health
                         

| Issue 21

Cancer stem cells – hope for the future?

Cancer and stem cells are both topical issues. But have you heard of cancer stem cells? As Massimiliano Mazza explains, this concept may revolutionise the treatment of cancer.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Health
                     

| Issue 16

Can you spot a cancer mutation?

How does cancer develop, and how can geneticists tell that a cell is cancerous? This teaching activity developed by the Communication and Public Engagement team from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK, answers these and other related questions.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Biology, Health
                   

| Issue 8

On the trail of a cure for cancer

Joan Massagué has discovered secrets that can save lives. An expert in cell division and the spread of cancer, he is one of the 50 most quoted researchers in all scientific fields. He speaks to Sarah Sherwood about his recent work on metastasis and his hopes for a cure for cancer.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Profiles