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Showing 10 results from a total of 98

| issue 35

Sunspots on a rotating Sun

Explore simple harmonic motion with real astronomical images.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Mathematics, Astronomy / space
     

| issue 35

Geometry can take you to the Moon

Measure the distance from Earth to the Moon using high-school geometry and an international network of schools and observatories. 

Ages: 14-16;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space, Mathematics
   

| Issue 34

Planet parade in the morning sky

Right now (and continuing until late February 2016), Mercury, Venus, Saturn, Mars, and Jupiter are visible in the sky in a straight line: a rare astronomical show.

Ages: not applicable;
Topics: Astronomy / space
 

| Issue 34

Planetary energy budgets

Understanding Earth’s climate system can teach us about other planets.

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space, Earth science
       

| Issue 31

Starlight inside a light bulb

Different stars shine with different colours, and you can use a light bulb to help explain why.

Ages: 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space
   

| Issue 31

The challenging logistics of lunar exploration

The path to the Moon is paved with many challenges. What questions do the next generation of space explorers need to answer?

Ages: <11, 11-14, 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space, Earth science, Science and society
       

| Issue 30

Camping under the stars — the ESO Astronomy Camp 2013

On 26 December 2013, after a long and exciting trip, 56 secondary-school students from 18 countries arrived at their destination: the picturesque alpine village of Saint-Barthélemy, Italy, where the Astronomical Observatory of the Autonomous Region of the Aosta Valley (OAVdA) was built because of…

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Astronomy / space
       

| Issue 29

More than meets the eye: how space telescopes see beyond the rainbow

How do astronomers investigate the life cycle of stars? At the European Space Agency, it’s done using space-based missions that observe the sky in ultraviolet, visible and infrared light – as this fourth article in a series about astronomy and the electromagnetic spectrum describes.

Ages: 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space
       

| Issue 29

Simulating the effect of the solar wind

​The smooth operation of communications satellites can be influenced by solar weather. Mimic this effect on a smaller scale in the classroom with a simple demonstration.

Ages: 14-16, 16-19;
Topics: Physics, Astronomy / space, Engineering